Contemporary Australian Feminist Poetry Anthology — Submissions Closing Soon

PrintHunter Anthology of Australian Contemporary Feminist Poetry
Co-edited by Jessica L Wilkinson and Bonny Cassidy

There is no single generation of feminism living in Australia. The editors of this anthology came of age under the slogan, “Girls can do anything!” and studied amongst the poetry of Gig Ryan, Ania Walwicz, Judith Wright and Oodgeroo Noonuccal. Now we write and teach in the wake of Gillards misogyny speech and the SlutWalk movement.

How is the complex discussion and realisation of gender equality playing itself out in contemporary poetry in Australia? What spectrum of feminist politics can be heard there? And what is a feminist poem’ – how many kinds of what John Kinsella would call performative activism? Would you even know it if you saw one? Is a current, local feminist poetics represented in form, voice, content, or all at once?

Following from a strong tradition of Australian women’s writing anthologies and feminist journals, the editors of this new anthology seek to explore the ever-evolving terrain of feminist poetics by opening the conversation to all voices.

We are calling for submissions of unpublished poems that offer poetic responses to these questions. We want poems that determine and challenge what contemporary feminist poetry and poetics might be. We are looking for diversity and imagination, and for poems that make exciting engagements with form and voice.

There is no restriction on the sex, age or literary profile of contributors. Authors should be writing in or from Australia, or be Australian citizens living anywhere in the world. Please submit 1-3 poems only. Submissions should be by email attachment only. Attachments should be a single doc, docx or rtf file. PDFs and Pages documents will not be read. Unfortunately the resources of this publication mean that only written text poems can be accepted (no sound or video files, please).

Please include a cover sheet in your submission attachment. The cover sheet needs to provide the authors name, a 50-word biography and full contact details.

Email submissions to: anthology@hunterpublishers.com.au

Deadline for submissions: November 30, 2015

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Little is known about the French colony of la Ville de Baudin.

Little is known about the French Tasmanian colony of la Ville de Baudin. Less still about its most mysterious colonist, Henri Maurice Claudet.

For the first time, The Diemenois presents the correct and true account of the sensational escape, seclusion, and cruel demise of one of history’s most infamous men. A tale of intrigue, blackmail, conspiracy, and murder. Coming this November!

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The shape of the curves is what matters and not their origin.

The singular genius of Kurt Vonnegut. I guess this is what they mean by narrative arc:

 

Unstuck In Time: a journey through Kurt Vonnegut’s life and novels by Gregory D. Sumner is out now.

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‘Now whoever has courage, and a strong and collected spirit in his breast, let him come forward, lace on the gloves and put up his hands.’

The walls of Gleason’s iconic gym in Brooklyn echo these words of the poet Virgil. Join Mischa Merz on her journey from Melbourne to Gleason’s and all the way to the US Masters Golden Gloves title and, along the way, discover the secret history of women in boxing, in The Sweetest Thing.

And, of course, you can buy a copy of The Sweetest Thing in good bookshops everywhere or just right here.

 

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‘I wondered, what it is that we hear in silence.’ Patrick Holland on The Source of the Sound.

When John Hunter approached me about an Australian edition of this collection, he asked what I meant by calling it The Source of the Sound when the final story was called, instead, ‘The Source of the Silence’.
Antonymy is a more intimate relationship than synonymy. Love could still be love without a red, red rose but our understanding of love would be greatly diminished if we had never encountered dislike, or hatred. The hero depends on the villain for his very existence.
The relationship between binary opposites becomes stranger the more we consider it. How often a great saint has been an equally great sinner: St Paul the missionary had been Saul the killer of Christians, the first century equivalent of a Gestapo officer. Waterless deserts and oceans occupy a common space in the human imagination, so Prester John could claim the deserts that surrounded his kingdom contained fish; so camels are called ships.
The universe is full of God’s silence … the question is whether we perceive in that silence an absence or a presence. Contemplatives of various traditions throughout the ages have contended that silence has a sound.
For the entire ten years that this collection spans, from oldest story to most recent, I was fascinated by the music of Arvo Pärt, especially by his silences – the silences, say, that surround each note of his apparently simple piano piece Fu?r Alina, and make those notes sound immense, as though they have been carved out of rock. I wondered, what it is that we hear in silence. Certainly it is not nothing. ‘Nothing’, to me, means meaninglessness. If anything is ‘nothing’ it is noise; a thing that saturates our lives in the 21st Century. Silence can be menacing, fertile, reverent, mysterious but it is not nothing … This collection’s final story, ‘The Source of the Silence’, is a response to the murder of a close friend of my sister, many years ago in the town where we grew up. As a story of tragic death, it is concerned with the greatest silence, that which resides on the far bank of the Styx … When writing it I was thinking of Pärt’s Tabula Rasa, which descends in steps toward a D minor chord it never reaches, that sounds in silence. In the same way I hope a reader will hear the last, unwritten, words of this book without my writing them.

Buy The Source of the Sound.

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Tony Birch Makes Miles Franklin Shortlist

Congratulations to Tony Birch who has been shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award for his hauntingly beautiful novel, Blood. Go Tony. We are stoked beyond belief.

Anyone who has followed Tony’s career will know just how richly he deserves this acknowledgement of his talent and his work. For those who came in late, now is the perfect time to discover Tony’s Father’s Day.

And, just quietly, the $9 on offer from bookmaking wunderkind Tom Waterhouse is the sort of ripe, juicy fruit that cannot be overlooked. A genuine literary subsidy — a kind of publisher’s superannuation.

You can pick up a copy of Father’s Day here.

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